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Is Damsel in Defense worth the hype? (review)

If a soap MLM makes you throw weird family parties where you compare lathers, what kind of a rave will a self defense MLM encourage you to throw?

Damsel in Defense calls them “empower hours”. While they might seem a little out there, the company has actually done pretty well in recent years.

Does this mean I’m involved?

This video explains:

 

We schedule 30 minutes for each call, so only schedule if you’re serious:

All good? Back to the review…

Overview

Humour aside, this is about as unique as MLMs get, and one that has captured a niche that’s difficult to argue with.  Pointing out the ethical grey areas of MLMs seems kind of petulant when applied to self-defense, particularly women and children.

The company was founded by Mindy Lin and Bethany Hughes in 2011.  The idea was for products to be visually appealing but effective (and non-lethal.)  There’s tasteful statistic dropping around the website about attack statistics and yes, this is tapping into fear to sell products – how you go about that at a selling party without looking like an aggressive paranoiac is unclear – but these are products for real life, which is great.

Products

There’s more in their catalogs, but their products include… (1)

Hard ‘lil Hand: $25.00

A hand-held striking tool.

Sock It To Me: $10.00

A keychain sized striking tool.

Holla Hers/His: $15.00

A sound alarm with LED flashlight.

Perfect Pepper: $20.00

Pepper spray.

Gotcha Stun Gun: $95.00

A USB rechargeable stun gun disguised as a camera, comes with an alarm and LED flashlight.

Get A Grip: $65.00

Handheld stun gun and LED flashlight.

Digital Defense: $29.95 per month for individuals / $59.95 for a family

It’s great to see some products designed for boys too even if only in different colours.

Opportunity

This is a little complicated, but bear with me.

Damsel in Defense operates on a unilevel compensation structure at four levels deep.  First you pay $149.00 to join as a Recruit, getting a “Knight in Shining Armour” kit – a bucket of Damsel in Defense products.

The affiliate ranks are:

Recruit: $149.00 signup fee

Protegé: generate $1000 in accumulated PV

Junior Mentor: generate $150 PV a month and maintain at least one active affiliate

Mentor: generate $500 PV a month, maintain at least one qualified affiliate and have a total downline volume of $2000 GV per month

Senior Mentor: generate $500 PV a month, maintain at least two qualified affiliates and have a total downline volume of $4000 GV per month

Director: generate $500 PV a month, maintain at least four qualified affiliates and have a downline generating $7500 TV (team volume)  per month

Crystal Director: generate $500 PV a month, maintain at least four qualified affiliates (one at Director rank or higher) and have a downline generating $7500 TV and $15,000 GV a month

Pearl Director: generate $500 PV a month, maintain at least four qualified affiliates (two at Director rank or higher) and have a downline generating $7500 TV and $30,000 GV a month

Diamond Director: generate $500 PV a month, maintain at least four qualified affiliates (four at the Director rank or higher) and have a downline generating $7500 TV and $75,000 GV a month

Whew.  Why do MLMs insist on giving ranks weird geologically-inspired names?  Why not something a little more imaginative?  Go with the theme of the products and name each rank after a boxing weight or something?

Active affiliates need to generate at least $150.00 in commissions over three months, and going inactive will see your downline transfer to the first active upline affiliate.

You’ll also get some snazzatronic residual commissions, which sound fun but are really same old, same old.

Team Bonus is a payot based on an affiliate’s entire team and their own product purchases.  Your percentage is down to your rank.  Directors get 2%, Crystal Director’s 3%, Pearl Director’s 4% and Diamond Director’s 5%.

Generation Bonuses use the unilevel structure as residual commissions.  A generation is when a Director rank or higher ends up on a unilevel leg.  Your own rank comes back into play to define how much commission you can earn.  Crystal Director’s get 3% on the first generation, Pearl’s 3% on first and second generations, and Diamond’s 3% on first, second and third generations.

There’s performance stipulations though.  You’ve got to conjure up $150.00 in PV over a three month period, or you’re going to get hit with undercuts.  Basically, your downline gets taken off you.

Hmm.  So unless you’re a marketing veteran and won’t have any kind of learning curve, you’re running the risk of losing your progress at all times.  That sucks.

Recap

There’s emphasis here on being active with your sales so you don’t have your recruits cut.  The compensation plan is a little muddled but seems to have actual structure, so you’re not pitching in without any kind of ladder.  There’s not a great deal of information about training though, even on their host page, which is a little unnerving considering you’re teaching people how to use a stun gun.

The products themselves are pretty swish, but also a bit evergreen.  You’re not going to need a monthly top up on a jabbing tool.  It should last for years.  Helpful relatives are only going to have so many younger relations they can gift pepper sprays and personal alarms to before things get weird.  The only renewable product is the digital protection lan, but there’s a cap on digital PV for some reason.

The loss of your downline after a three month slump is a big downside though.  You’d best not come down with illness or family emergency, or you’re stuffed.

Damsel in Defense puts a big onus on teaching children how to be safe without making them fear everyone around them.  That’s probably the best way of looking at this, or you’re essentially making money off people’s fear.  Get the products or get kidnapped?

In some ways, that sucks worse than telling people a glowing pill is going to cure their arthritis.

Look, I’m not a Damsel in Defense hater, as I’ve shown throughout the review. But there are too many ways to be making money on the internet to spend your time on something like this if passive income is what you are looking for.

In other words, you might like our training because it teaches the “good life” without selling self defense courses to your family and friends.

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